Category: Artist in Residence

Meet the 2024 Artists-in-Residence!

Meet the 2024 Artists-in-Residence!
April 3, 2024

We are thrilled to announce five new artists for Mount Auburn’s Artist-in-Residence program, now in its tenth year. Between April 2024 and April 2025, the artists will be working on original site-specific creative projects inspired by an in-depth experience at the cemetery. All projects will be presented to the public and announcements will be made on our website, e-newsletters, and on social media.

(more…)

Life and Death Stories: A Conversation with Artists-in-Residence Debra Wise & Eliza Fichter

Life and Death Stories: A Conversation with Artists-in-Residence Debra Wise & Eliza Fichter
March 27, 2024

In 2023, we welcomed seven Artists-in-Residence to create original works inspired by their experiences at Mount Auburn.

Throughout the past year, Artists-in-Residence Eliza Fichter and Debra Wise have been interviewing people about their relationships with Mount Auburn Cemetery and how their reflections on death have shaped their living. The conversations were then crafted into a series of short audio narratives. Register for their concluding event: Tuesday, April 30, 2024, 6:30-8:00 PM


(more…)

Reborn: A Conversation with Artist-in-Residence Eden Rayz

Reborn: A Conversation with Artist-in-Residence Eden Rayz
March 16, 2024

In 2023, we welcomed seven Artists-in-Residence to create original works inspired by their experiences at Mount Auburn. Meet composer and musician Eden Rayz. [above photo by Artist-in-Residence Billy Hickey]

You are a composer, cellist, and freelance private music teacher with a Master’s degree in music composition and theory from the Boston Conservatory at Berklee. You are also an extreme vocalist, cellist, and lyricist for a death metal band. How would you describe your work as a musician?

Right now, my work is centered around expanding the functionality of listening experiences as individual and community rituals. With the musical death awareness meditation “Nothingness is Impossible,” listeners are invited to meditate on their own relationships with death and dying. With “Aboriginal Sensible Muchness,” there’s another invitation to walk, notice, and question why our judgments exist. I judge this oak tree as beautiful, but this dead bird as ugly. Why is that? With “Lux Aeterna (which translates to eternal light),” the work I’m currently writing, the construct of time and our relationships with it will be examined.

(more…)